Glossary of terms used on this site

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Glossaries

Term Definition
Product Backlog

The product backlog (or "backlog") is the requirements for a system, expressed as a prioritized list of product backlog Items. These included both functional and non-functional customer requirements, as well as technical team-generated requirements. While there are multiple inputs to the product backlog, it is the sole responsibility of the product owner to prioritize the product backlog.

 

 

During a Sprint planning meeting, backlog items are moved from the product backlog into a sprint, based on the product owner's priorities.

Product Backlog Item

In Scrum, a product backlog item ("PBI", "backlog item", or "item") is a unit of work small enough to be completed by a team in one Sprint iteration. Backlog items are decomposed into one or more tasks.

 

 

See also backlog effort estimation unit.

Product Backlog Item Effort

Some Scrum practitioners estimate the effort of product backlog items in ideal engineering days, but many people prefer less concrete-sounding backlog effort estimation units. Alternative units might include story points, function points, or "t-shirt sizes" (1 for small, 2 for medium, etc.). The advantage of vaguer units is they're explicit about the distinction that product backlog item effort estimates are not estimates of duration.  Also, estimates at this level are rough guesses that should never be confused with actual working hours.

 

 

Note that sprint tasks are distinct from product backlog items and task effort remaining is always estimated in hours.

Product Burndown Chart

In Scrum, the product burndown chart is a "big picture" view of a project's progress. It shows how much work was left to do at the beginning of each sprint. The scope of this chart spans releases; however, a release burndown chart is limited to a single release.

Product Owner Role

In Scrum, a single person must have final authority representing the customer's interest in backlog prioritization and requirements questions.

 

 

This person must be available to the team at any time, but especially during the sprint planning meeting and the sprint review meeting.